So you’ve reached the part of your romance novel when things are supposed to get sexy. You might think a sacrifice to Dionysus in the form of a case of pinot noir is required. After all you’re about to summon the courage to invoke the great manroot.

But before any pink parts make an appearance, take a moment to consider what level of heat you want to bring to the party.

If you’re writing an inspirational Amish vampire romance, for example, you may choose to have nice closed door love scene, after the couple has sworn to be true to each other for eternity at a lovely after dark commitment ceremony.

For a historical novel set in Victorian England, you might need a couple of chapters just to get your heroine out of her corset and multiple layers of undergarments and onto your hero’s throbbing member.

Or maybe you’re writing a smoking hot motorcycle club new adult story featuring Bone, an angst ridden alpha hero. He requires sex in every single one of his point of view chapters or his penis will explode from an overabundance of testosterone. (Fortunately, your heroine is a nurse who can’t bear to watch Bone succumb to death by stiffy.)

No matter if your book is sweet as salted caramel brownies or hotter than ghost pepper chili, you want plenty of scenes filled with sexual tension. And whether your characters either go off stage to do the nasty or have sex on the front lawn like alley cats in heat, you want to show their feelings and use words that make the reader sit up and take notice.

Manroot and nether yay ya are perfect.

After all, you don’t want to use words that make your characters sound like idiots, gynecologists, proctologists or snarky fifth-graders. True, there are publishers that have words they prefer their authors use for the equipment and cringe-worthy ones they want them to avoid, but hey, if they don’t like your vocabulary, you don’t want to write for them anyway!

Seriously? Let’s talk about sex.

When you write the love scene(s) with your hero and heroine, or hero and hero, or heroine and heroine, or some combination thereof, imagine what happens step by step. Include sensory details related to sight, sound, scent, taste, and touch. Consider each character’s reaction, particularly for the point of view character and how consummating their relationship changes the characters.

A great resource for writing sex scenes is Desmond Morris’ Twelve Steps of Intimacy. These steps are a nice road map to a healthy romantic encounter. Make sure the characters experience the steps in order to build trust and intimacy. Here’s a phenomenal blog post by Terry Odell that explains steps.

Now, go forth and make the magic happen. If you need a photo of your favorite Avenger for inspiration and a glass of wine, no worries. Just take your time and let your characters express their love. If you do decide to shut the door, be sure to close it gently and not slam it shut.

Some books that might help:

The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Writing Erotic Romance by Alison Kent

How to Write Hot Sex: Tips from Multi-Published Erotic Romance Authors by Shoshanna Evers and Giselle Renarde

Passionate Ink: A Guide to Writing Erotic Romance by Angela Knight

The Everything Guide to Writing a Romance Novel: From writing the perfect love scene to finding the right publisher–All you need to fulfill your dreams by Christie Craig and Faye Hughes

Naughty Words for Nice Writers: A Sexual and Spanking Thesaurus by Cara Bristol

 

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